Monthly Archives: April 2016

Watch “Poverty, Violence, and the Developing Mind”

From the Center for Law, Brain and Behavior @ MGH: An increasing number of children are at risk for exposure to severe violence and dangerous living conditions. During this panel event, experts wrestled with the following question: What are the implications of trauma exposure and toxic stress for healthy brain development? Click here to watch the webinar.

Supporting an Open Data Standards Approach for MassCourt Data*


The following is an open reply to the Massachusetts Trial Court’s call for comments regarding its Proposed Uniform Rules on Public Access to Court Records. It is the joint comment of multiple organizations and individuals. CPCS is a signatory, and this post is meant to provide some context explaining why. For a complete list of signatories, visit http://ma-court-comment.github.io/


Given that the adoption of a common data standard for the Massachusetts legal community offers the promise of increased efficiency, lower information sharing costs, and improved access to courts, we propose that the Massachusetts Trial Courts adopt a set of data standards to facilitate sharing information between the Trial Courts and other stakeholders, and that all data deemed publicly available be made accessible in a machine readable format consistent via an application programming interface (API) overseen by the courts. This would supersede the need for the Courts to create multiple, disparate portals for various stakeholders, as described in Rule 5. It would also simplify the procedures described in Rule 3 as the use cases envisioned could be conducted over the API.



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Girls in the Juvenile Justice system are often victims of family violence, report finds.

“Girls in the criminal justice system report far higher rates of in-home sexual abuse and are detained for minor offenses more often than boys, in what becomes a self-perpetuating cycle of imprisonment.”  Girls in Juvenile Detention are often the Victims of Family Abuse, Report finds , here is the link to the report discussed in this article  Gender Injustice. 

Less is more when it comes to probation for juveniles

This article is a good compilation of the studies out there that with most kids less (probation supervision/conditions) is more. Case Now Strong for Ending Probation as a Default Disposition in Juvenile Defense.

This is also what former (acting) Mass. Commissioner of Probation Ron Corbett says about probation generally in his article The Burdens of Leniency: The Changing Face of Probation.